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When I was a kid my dad bought me a youth compound bow .   I loved shooting it but I never shot at anything other than the practice target in our yard. I spent all my hunting years using firearms even though the desire to bow hunt was always just below the surface.

Primal Gear Unlimited Survival Bow Review for 2020

Primal Gear Unlimited Survival Bow Review for 2020When I was a kid my dad bought me a youth compound bow .  I loved shooting it but I never shot at anything other than the practice target in our yard. I spent all my hunting years using firearms even though the desire to bow hunt was always just below the surface.  I didn’t have a person in my life who was an experienced archer, so I never took the leap to go bow hunting.  Recently the desire to become an archer became too great and I decided to take the plunge into the bow world.  To my dismay, I quickly realized how expensive this new endeavor was going to become.  Sadly, I just couldn’t justify spending that kind of money to start out, until I talked to a friend of mine who has shot bows for years.  He recommended that I check out Primal Gear Unlimited and their folding bow.  Their folding bow sells for $149.00, which was more in my price range. Quick Navigation "Primal Gear Unlimited" Survival Bow Review A Tip From A Friend Specs A Bow For Your Bug Out Bag? Conclusion Primal Gear Unlimited Survival Bow Review A Tip From A Friend I talked to my friend extensively about the bow, since he has one for every member of his family.  After our two hour discussion I went to the Primal Gear Unlimited website ( goprimalnow.com ) and placed an order.  Primal Gear Unlimited currently offers three bows, at 40lb, 50lb and 55lb draws.  I ordered the 55lb. draw and a set of three take down arrows. Here are the specifications of the bow from the manufacturer’s website: Specs Can easily be converted for right-handed or left-handed shooters. Average arrow speed is 181 feet per second. The riser is milled from T-6 6061 aircraft grade aluminum. Limbs are made from fiberglass. The folding bow is 23” x 1.5” x 1.5” when folded and 59” long when extended. Weight is 2.25lbs. The bow comes with an Endless Loop Dacron string and an owner’s manual. I was very excited waiting for this package to arrive, and when it did, my excitement soared as I opened the box.  The black compact bow was roughly the length of my arm.  I took it out of the packaging and admired how light and compact it was.  I quickly undid the Velcro strap that held the string and the limbs in place.  The limbs fold out and after a few turns of the locking bolts (Do Not over tighten, just snug tight with your hand) the limbs were set.  I have never strung a bow in my life, but was able to string this bow in a matter of seconds.  It only took about a minute to set the bow up from folded to ready to shoot and the best part is that it requires no tools to do this.  The only time you will need tools for this bow is when converting the limbs from a right-handed to a left-handed shooter.  For that purpose, all you need is a simple Phillips screwdriver . The other feature of this bow that many people might not like is that it does not have a sight, as it is more of a long bow design. I’m sure if a person was experienced they could fit a sight onto it but in my opinion, that would take away from its intended simplistic design.  Personally, I like that it does not have a sight, as this makes the experience more traditional and challenging. A Bow For Your Bug Out Bag? The take down arrows are extremely cool.  There are two inserts in the middle of the shaft where the arrow screws together.  I put all three shafts together and began shooting at ten yards.  I know this seems ridiculously close, but as I stated earlier, I haven’t shot a bow in years and I did not feel like spending my time looking for missed arrows.  I also started at this range until I got the hang of the bow and felt comfortable with my shooting position.  Once I felt comfortable, I moved back to twenty yards.  At first my shots were not very consistent but I was not missing the target. Surprisingly, I was shooting high, from my view point I would have thought I was shooting quite low. After adjusting my finger placement and smoothing out my release I was beginning to shoot consistent groups.  I would say my best group was three shots that were no more than five inches apart.  Finally I moved back to thirty yards and my groups began to get a bit worse and I even missed a few times.  However at this point I was starting to get fatigued since I had shot around thirty times in a row and I did not have arm protection so that was beginning to hurt. Also Read: KodaBow Review – Bravo Zulu Where the concept of this bow really shines is for backpackers.  This bow and the take down arrows easily fit inside a pack making it much easier to transport over a traditional longbow or modern compound bow.  Also considering that the set up time for this bow is about one minute without needing tools, just adds to the appeal. What makes this bow ideal for a survival situation?  Its size can’t be beat.  It can easily fit, along with the take down arrows, into a standard bug out bag and even under a vehicle seat.  I’m positive that it can even be strapped to the frame of a bicycle if one were so inclined.  So the size of the bow and arrows is a huge plus for transportation purposes. Also this bow can shoot any kind of arrow. It can shoot carbon, fiberglass, or wood arrows.  This increases the availability of arrows drastically, especially if you happen upon some arrows or even need to make your own.  Being able to easily switch the limbs for someone who shoots right handed or left handed makes it much more versatile and user friendly, especially if you are in a group. Conclusion The best feature has got to be the price.  Even though I have not had this bow for a long time I feel I don’t need to look any further for any other kind of bow.  In fact I have already order another one for my wife.  For the quality, ease of use, simplicity, and compact size for the price that Primal Gear Unlimited offers, I give this a five out of five star rating. Barnett Vortex 45-Pounds Youth Archery Bow (Camo) For right handed use Draw weight: 19-45lbs See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 10:18 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Photos By: One Eleven Photo , Primal Gear Unlimited , The author – Tinderwolf Other interesting articles: Survival Gear Review: Sphinx Arms SDP Compact "Survival Gear Review" : Cold Steel Pocket Bushman Knife Survival Gear Review: 1887 T-Model 12 Gauge Shotgun Monovault Survival Gear Review for 2020

Modern Shooter: At H&H Precision Rifles Shooting School

Modern Shooter: At H&H Precision Rifles Shooting School

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d030f76a_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d030f76a_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The world is not composed of benchrests. So, why do shooters learn and train like it is? They certainly won’t at H&H Precision Rifles’ shooting school. Once a year, the gunmaker offers customers who have purchased a new rifle a weekend shooting camp. The proud H&H rifle owners delve deep into the ins and outs of their precision instruments, ensuring the firearms are as familiar as their mothers’ voices. Additionally, they are steeped in the finer points of making their rifles perform through a healthy dose of meticulous precision shooting instruction. Related GunDigest Articles Modern Shooter: On Safari At The FTW Ranch Modern Shooter: Double Eagle Tactical Training Modern Shooter: At The Range With H&H Precision Rifles And the last place they are likely to find themselves learning over these couple of days is at a tame old shooting range. Like real life, H&H challenges its students to make shots down in the dust, off rocky outcroppings and with the wind blowing high-desert grass in their faces. The Modern Shooter team was lucky enough to get a peek into H&H Precision’s elite school in this week’s episode. And as the above clip shows, the expert instructors leave no stone unturned. From mitigating heartbeat interference to managing uneven terrain to sling methods that milk every ounce of accuracy, camp attendants come away with the tools and techniques to be true marksmen and women.

Benchmade 915 Triage: Everyday Survival

Benchmade 915 Triage: Everyday Survival

Every day carry (EDC) blades have a multitude of practical uses, but what happens when you must rely on a knife for survival? This is where the Benchmade 915 Triage excels. The modified sheepsfoot blade, environment-resistant steel, carbide glass breaker, and safety cutter make the 915 Traige a valuable asset as a survival tool. However, the 915’s sharp edge and Axis locking mechanism also make it a handy folder for every day needs. Blade The 915 Triage features a satin-finished modified sheepsfoot blade of a unique steel: N680. N680 has excellent corrosion resistance, even in salt water. It also has strong wear resistance and edge retention properties. Benchmade’s 915 Triage features a modified sheepsfoot blade shape, which provides a long cutting edge (3.5in) and a rounded tip (which is valuable in avoiding injuring someone in the application of cutting something near their skin, such as, removing clothing from the site of an injury). Benchmade’s 30°-30° v-grind gives the 915 Triage a sharp, but durable edge. Opposite the main blade is a safety/strap cutter tucked into the grip. The hardy 440C steel isn’t as environmentally resistant as the main blade’s N680 steel, but it features a protective black Cerakote coating as a corrosion resistance aid. The hook shaped strap cutter is two inches in length, but its edge is .5in across. The flat grind on the 440C gives the cutter a sharp, lasting edge. Grip Benchmade markets the 915 as a survival folder, and as such the grips offered are textured G10 scales in black or safety orange. Using G10 grips over stainless steel liners keeps this decently-sized knife at a manageable weight: 5.1oz. The grip is ample enough to accommodate large hands, but isn’t so big as to be unwieldy for smaller hands (such as this reviewer’s). The Benchmade 915 Triage’s single finger groove and jimping on the back of the grip add to its ergonomics when using a traditional grip style. The knife’s pommel  and the base of the safety cutter feature additional jimping that helps the user get firm purchase on the folder when utilizing the 915’s alternate edge. At the butt of the Triage is an additional survival feature: the carbide glass breaker. Deploy and Locking Mechanisms Both the main blade and the strap cutter are deployed via thumb stud. The thumb stud on the modified sheepsfoot blade is ambidextrous, while the safety cutter’s stud is necessarily single sided (the 915’s grip features a small cutout through which the hooked cutter’s stud protrudes. In this fashion, the cutter remains flush with the liners until deployed. The 915 Triage’s main blade features the Benchmade folding knife standard: the Axis® locking mechanism. When engaged, the knife is without wobble or blade play. The strap cutter does not have a locking mechanism, but the nature of the hook-shaped edge means that its use isn’t hampered by that fact. Carry Considerations The 915 is a bit on the large side for what might be considered a convenient EDC folder (closed, it measures 4.7in, with a fully deployed length of 8.2″), and its .45″ width makes it a tad chunky. But, this reviewer only found issue carrying it when wearing tiny-pocketed girl jeans. Other than that, the reversible deep pocket clip helps the folder tuck away neatly (in a tip up configuration), and keeps it there with strong retention. For those who appreciate the convenience of keeping a blade on a lanyard, the 915 also features a lanyard hole at the butt of the knife. The Benchmade 915 Triage is an effective cutting tool with strong, wear resistant steel, a sharp,  but sturdy edge, and a stable locking mechanism. These elements allow the 915 to function well for a wide range of everyday uses. But, if you’re depending on an EDC blade to do more than open your mail, you may appreciate the Triage’s corrosion resistant steel, modified sheepsfoot blade shape, and its additional survival features – the hooked safety cutter and the carbide glass breaker. The Benchmade 915 Triage will perform for everyday tasks, but you may find it most valuable as a tool in your survival loadout. Specifications Blade material: N680 blade, 440 C safety cutter Blade hardness: 57-59 HRC blade, 58-60 HRC safety cutter Blade length: 3.5in Overall length: 8.2in Weight: 5.1oz Locking mechanism: Axis lock Clip: tip up, reversible MSRP: $170

AR-15 Review: Wilson Combat 6.8

AR-15 Review: Wilson Combat 6.8

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cbb60763_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cbb60763_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } One of the Wilson 6.8 rifles, here with an Aimpoint M4 on it. You’ll note that the Wilson BUIS doesn’t crowd the Aimpoint, and when it flips up the Wilson BUIS won’t bang the M4. Everyone knows a Wilson Combat 1911 is top of the line. In this AR-15 review, Patrick Sweeney argues the same can be said for the Wilson Combat 6.8. If you spend any time at all in a competitive endeavor, you’ll quickly realize that skill at any given contest does not necessarily carry over to another. The list of professional ballplayers (football, baseball, whatever) who were good on the field, and then good as a coach, is small. The list of professional sports figures who go on to open successful businesses is small, indeed. Skill in any endeavor is a rare thing. We should expect, therefore, that skill in two would be rarer still. Which is one of the things that makes Bill Wilson rare. Were I given to the usual sloppy hyperbole that modern writing schools seem to encourage so much, I’d call him unique. He isn’t. As good as he is, he isn’t the only one to be successful as a businessman in the field in which he saw such fame as a competitor. And make no mistake, he was a heavyweight back in the early days of IPSC, and he’s a heavyweight now in the field of custom guns. The folding Wilson front sight, which blends in nicely with the top rail of the free-float Wilson handguard. Starting with 1911s, Bill has expanded to the modern triumvirate of defensive artillery: the 1911, the 870, and the AR. Wilson ARs are built on 7075-T6 forgings, precision machined (and in this day and age that means CNC multi-axis machines) and hard-coat anodized. The receivers are then given a Wilson Armor-Tuff baked-on epoxy finish, in your choice of green, black, tan, gray or stainless, depending on the model. They all have Wilson match-grade barrels, 16, 18 or 20 inches, depending on what model you choose. The smallbores have 5.56 chambers for reliable chambering and to avoid the problems that .223 chambers can bring when fed a diet of 5.56-spec ammo. As with his 1911s, you can get a standard, Wilson-spec rifle: just pick the catalog number, phone or email your order, and your FFL will be receiving it in short order. Or you can custom-build the AR of your heart’s desire by starting with a Wilson model and substituting items such as flash hiders (Vortex, A2 or Wilson Tactical Muzzle brake?), stocks (Magpul or M4?), folding sights (Wilson makes a handful, front and rear), and your choice of railed handguard – and do you want low-profile rail ladders, or full-profile rail covers? Scope mounts, optics, pistol grips, charging handles, bolt releases, foregrips, all can be spec’d and either left as-is or Armor-Tuff® coated to match. Related GunDigest Articles AR-15 Review: Get Tactical in 2015 Handgun Review: Wilson Combat Tactical Carry AR-15 Review: Colt Expanse M4 But you knew all that, right? I mean, you’re an AR fan who stays in the know, so none of that is news to you. Well, guess again; Wilson is now making rifles in 6.8. Developed to provide a significant increase in terminal effectiveness without making recoil onerous, the 6.8 Remington SPC is a big step up. If you want a rifle chambered in a cartridge a lot more suited to hunting (and it will pass muster even in States where the DNR does not allow .223/5.56 for deer hunting) while being the modern, reliable, and accurate rifle of the 21st century, the 6.8 is a good choice. The Wilson 6.8 project simply takes the already-excellent Wilson AR and replaces the 5.56 parts with 6.8. The other Wilson 6.8 that arrived had a Trijicon scope on it, to take advantage of the long-range capabilities of the 6.8 cartridge. Too bad my home range is only good out to 100 yards. The barrel is a stainless medium weight match grade barrel with a 1:11 twist and an SPC II chamber. That means you have the pressure-lowering benefits of the new throat and leade and the accuracy of a match barrel but the relatively slow twist to increase bullet instability on impact. The gas system is mid-length, for a lower port pressure and less abrupt gas flow, while still maintaining a length-enough gas dwell time for reliable function. You have a choice of 16- or 18-inch barrels, and the railed forearm is appropriately proportioned for each. The match barrel is guaranteed to deliver MOA accuracy with match-grade ammo. The new Wilson Combat Quadrail is interesting. It is fully-railed on top, but on the side the rails are carved off just forward of the midpoint. That gives you a slimmer, more oval shape, and one that doesn’t have rails to gnaw at your hands. But the forward sections of rail provide plenty of space to mount lights, lasers, and other tactical goodies. The Wilson handguard, with the rear rails shaved off. It proves a less “bite-y” gripping surface and also gives you an oval to index the rifle vertically. The trigger is the Wilson single stage TTU for a clean and crisp letoff, but one that feels like any other AR trigger, just a lot nicer. If you opt for a complete rifle, you get Magpul stock and pistol grip. If , however, you already have an AR (let us hope it is a Wilson, so the upper won’t feel lonely) then you can simply acquire a Wilson 6.8 upper to put on your existing lower. Now, if you want to shave half a pound off your full-up weight, then the Wilson Tactical Hunter Lightweight 6.8 SPC will do that. With a 16-inch barrel of a slightly slimmer profile, the Tactical Hunter becomes a very light, handy, mid-power hunting rifle, and one with guaranteed MOA accuracy. But wait, we’re not done yet. Options! You get options.

Reloading Ammo: The Precise Business of Reloading AR Cartridges

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d8943d00_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d8943d00_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Given the characteristics of the firearm, reloading AR cartridges requires some special considerations. Given the characteristics of the rifle, reloading AR cartridges requires some special considerations compared to other firearms to keep them safe and accurate. Reloading for the AR cartridges requires a certain level of attention to details, to ensure that your handloads function properly through the AR action. My own experiences with MSRs are rather limited (I live in Upstate New York, where fun is illegal), but it was my first handloading experience for a Colt AR in .223/5.56mm that really opened my eyes as to what could go wrong. My buddy Josh Coon had a sweet Colt HBAR II, which (for reasons we couldn’t quite figure out) wasn’t shooting anywhere near where it should’ve been. It functioned fine, but the accuracy was mediocre at best. So, I loaded him up some handloads; you know, carefully weighing the powder charges, using match bullets, hand seating the primers. You can imagine my surprise when the gun jammed on almost every shot. Um, what?!? Related GunDigest Articles Reloading Ammo: Pitfalls of Using Old Pistol Reloading Data Reloading Ammo: An Abbreviated Look at Reloading Short Magnums Reloading Ammo: Groovy Bullet Groove Trends I had full-length resized the once-fired cases, and taken my time during the entire reloading process, so what the hell happened? Bottom line was that the full length resizing die didn’t resize enough of the rear portion of the case to feed properly in the Colt action. What I needed came soon after: a set of small base resizing dies. These dies resize the case almost all the way down the case body, and ensure that the cartridge will chamber correctly. I also picked up a Southern Ballistic Research case gauge, which helped immensely. The gauge will let you know which cases won’t chamber, which cases will chamber well, and those cases that have shoulder issues and may give headspacing issues. This little tool is a very worthwhile investment. Once the resizing issue was corrected, we moved on to correcting the accuracy issue, and soon enough the rifle was shooting the way we expected it to.

1911 Trigger Pretravel & Overtravel

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s We’ll go over how to adjust the pretravel and overtravel on your 1911 trigger to lower the slack before the break and reduce reset distance. Please see our disclaimer since this can potentially damage your gun and/or cause injury. 1911 Trigger Pretravel The pretravel is how much you have to press the trigger before you meet resistance and the break. First you need to make sure you have an adjustable trigger.  If not, first check out 1911 Trigger Installation & Fitting .  Our favorite aftermarket trigger is the Wilson Ultralight Match Trigger .  I like the length of the long. You’ll need to fully disassemble the lower part of your 1911. All you need to do is bend out the ears on your trigger bow using a small screwdriver or pliers.  The ears push against the frame and set your trigger back so you have to move it less.  Make sure you get the ears as matched up as possible. Reassemble to test and just go a little bit at a time.  If you bend it too much, the trigger is likely not going to fire during testing.  Just bend it back a little until you get it like you want it.  It doesn’t take much! 1911 Pretravel Adjustment Here you can watch Nic Taylor go over how to adjust pretravel: 1911 Trigger Overtravel Overtravel is how much the trigger continues to move after the break. This will dictate how much you have to let the trigger reset until you can shoot again. This one is easy to change without taking the gun apart.  All you need is the appropriate Allen wrench to fit in the trigger hole and reach the overtravel screw. 1911 Overtravel Screw Hole Screw inwards and test the trigger reset.  For the 1911, cock it and fire.  Keep your finger on the trigger and rack the slide.  Then see how much distance you need to let the trigger move before you hear the click. Test a little at a time and do some basic function checks to make sure it is working.  If you go too far in, the trigger will not press.  One way to do it is to screw in until you cannot fire, and then back it out 1 full turn. 1911 Overtravel Adjustment Screw After you like it and it passes all the function checks.  I like to put a little bit of blue non-permanent threadlocker since I’ve had the screw loosen from vibration. Watch Nic adjust his overtravel:

Summary

When I was a kid my dad bought me a youth compound bow .   I loved shooting it but I never shot at anything other than the practice target in our yard. I spent all my hunting years using firearms even though the desire to bow hunt was always just below the surface.